Social Media and Grieving

http://katewilcox.net/2013/11/08/dying-online/

I recently came across this article and it brought up a very interesting point in regards to the function of social media in the grieving process. I often see memorial pages on facebook, full of kind comments and happy memories of those who have passed, but I was not aware of the possibility of having a “virtual-death industry”. There are even websites that will analyze your previous tweets and continue to tweet for you even after you die!!

The digital age has opened a wide variety of possibilities, including planning your funeral online and/or leaving messages for those whom outlive you. Are these apps and websites now part of the normal grieving process? It’s interesting to see how the internet and new technologies can even effect life after death!

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About lauraroseeliza

Tulane senior, studying Marketing and Psychology. Born and raised in Sydney, Australia. Entrepreneurial Services Director at Fund 17 www.fund17.org
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2 Responses to Social Media and Grieving

  1. jfonsec1 says:

    Great article Laura! I had a friend of mine, Molly, die at the young age of 18 from Ovarian Cancer four years ago and her parents have chosen to keep her Facebook page running. This has proven to be a really helpful grieving tool for her family, myself, her friends, and my entire town. It is a blessing that we can simply go on Facebook and see the joy and happiness that Molly was able to bring into this world in her short 18 years.

    Keeping her Facebook active has also helped us promote the philanthropy we started in her honor. After she passed, we started “Team Molly” and have encouraged our neighboring towns to become a part of the Team and raise money for Ovarian Cancer research.

    I’ve provided both links to Molly’s Facebook page and the Team Molly page as an example for how beneficial social media can be in the grieving process.

    Molly’s page: https://www.facebook.com/mollyeisenberg?fref=ts
    Team Molly’s page: https://www.facebook.com/TeamMollyOCA

  2. This article reminds me of an interesting post on xkcd.com, where they tried to figure out when Facebook will have more profiles of dead people than of living people. The answer is either 2060 or 2130, depending on your assumptions: http://what-if.xkcd.com/69/

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